The Pro-Trump Mob Assault on the Capitol in One Word

The day after a pro-Trump mob assaulted the nation’s Capitol, Metro, a Mexico City tabloid, printed what this blogger declares the best headline ever on the whole messy situation.

Please also note the wonderful use of the word zafarrancho, a wonderful choice to describe Wednesday’s brawl.

Filing under “Why I love Mexico” and “Mexicans: How Can Anyone Not Like Us?”

Biden Beats Trump and this Is the Tabloid Cover for the Ages

I’ve spent many, MANY, years on this blog trying to explain “Latin things” or “Mexican things” to a mostly monolingual, crowd and I believe I’ve been pretty good at it.

Until now.

The above cover by a Mexican tabloid perfectly captured (prematurely, mind you)  what happened on November 7, 2020, when the presidential election was finally called for Joe Biden, making Trump one of the few incumbents to lose a bid for reelection (thank God!) It also makes it harder to explain, so I will let the wonderful people from Urban Dictionary to take it from here.

Thanks, perro!

The Hispanic Star Joins Nonsensical Trend of Putting an ‘Ñ’ where it Doesn’t Belong

Excuse me?

Remember that nonsensical trend of putting “eñes” where they don’t belong just to make something look –and sound– more authentically “Latino?”

Well, it looks like salsa makers and Hispanic journalists organizations are not alone in this thing. The latest to jump on the nonsensican “eñe wagon” (or should I say “wagoñ?”) is The Hispanic Star, a non-for-profit organization that seeks to “raise awareness of the contributions of the Hispanic community to the United States.”

According to its latest mailer, the Hispanic Star wants us to SAVE THE DATE and celebrate the 2020 Hipanic Heritage… Mñnth [SIC] which I believe it’s nonsense English for the word “month”.

I get it. As we approach the dreaded Hispanic Heritage Month, corporations, politicians and NGOs want to sound all cute and Latin in order to properly pander to my people, but how about learning first to put the “eñe” where it DOES belong? Like in “jalapeño?” for example?

Oh, and don’t get me started on #ItsPoblanoNotPoblaño

Trump Meets Peña Nieto in Germany. A Tragicomedy Ensues


It was brief –and painful.

U.S. President Donald Trump and Enrique Peña Nieto on Friday had their first face-to-face meeting since Trump took office, and while the encounter lasted only a few minutes, it was enough for El Trumpo to assert that he’ll “absolutely” have Mexico pay for his famous wall.

Fortunately for this blogger — and the world at large — Mexican tuiteros came through to spice up the otherwise tragic encounter.

Here are only a few of my favorite Twitter moments of this year’s G-20 meeting. Be sure to come back, as I’m going to be updating this post throughout this hilarious/tragic day.

Leadership

Real Life Memes

Clueless Leader

Hear No Evil

What? I didn’t Hear Anything

Human Sacrifice

Video via ABC News

BREAKING: John F. Kennedy to Visit Mexico Real Soon

mexicokennedyfeb16

Forget El Nacional mistaking one version of Donald Trump with another one.

Mexico’s El Sol de Hermosillo today embarked in one of the world’s most beautiful fuck ups in the history of print media fuck ups.

However, for the purpose of this blog, this is just, well, wonderful, so all this blogger can say is: Thank you, thank you, Mexican Twitter, I owe you one*

Via: Jorge L./Twitter

*Many, actually, but who is counting?

Hillary Clinton Does ‘El Gordo y la Flaca,’ Because You Gotta do What you Gotta Do

hillary

Hillary Clinton made Hispanic History (i.e. Hispandering) on Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016 by showing up at Univision’s long-running El Gordo y la Flaca; declaring Mexican food is her favorite and even getting up to dance salsa with the crew.

Alas, she did not take her clothes off to join The Fat One in his famous jacuzzi. Now THAT would have been entertaining…

Now I’m dead.

DEVELOPING: This blog post will be updated as soon as this recovers from shock (which will likely occur until after Happy Hour)

Via: Univision.com

Obama Talks to Pánfilo: It’s not Que Bolá, It’s Qué Bolá. Qué Lío

ObamaPanfilo

Oh yes!

Before his historic (and hysterical) trip to Havana, Cuba, President Obama called Luis Silvia (aka Pánfilo), a retired, not-too-bright Cuban man who plays a (subtle) satire of how Cuban people often have to use their wits to escape the poverty and absurdity of life in modern communist Cuba.

In a video of the skit posted by the U.S. Embassy in Havana, Pánfilo ends up getting connected directly to Obama in the Oval Office only to be tangled up in the whole Qué bolá (or is it Qué bóla?) thing.

Watch, anyway, and let’s discuss this tomorrow. This blogger is too “Bolá” to make any more sense tonight.

‘El País’: Mobile Services Move Slowly in Latin America, Because my People Ride Horses –or Something

MovilLento

Yes, the above image (via Getty) was the image of choice by the editors of El País to illustrate an otherwise unremarkable story about mobile services and access in Latin America.

I think this is all great, but I have one question: Shouldn’t the services move rapidly — not slowly — while on a horse? I mean, I’m confused.

¡Ajúa, pues!

 

‘The New York Times’ Launches Spanish-language Edition; Sadly not Called ‘El New York Times’

Behold: Spanish text above the fold
Oy, vey! There’s Spanish text on the front page *and* above the fold!

Monday, February 8, 2016 was a good day for Spanish-language media.

The New York Times officially announced what had been the worst kept secret in town: The launch of a Spanish-language Website to “offer the best of our journalism for a Spanish-speaking audience.”

In a note to readers, editor Lydia Polgreen introduced the Spanish-language site, adding it will not only include translated material from the New York Times, but original stories by a growing team of editors and reporters, mostly based in Mexico. Polgreen also tweeted the following photo of a very-happy-looking team in what looks like a tiny office:

This blogger promptly favorited the site, followed everyone involved and even signed up to receive The New York Times en Español newsletter, mostly because it features a section called Reposado, which I believe has something to do with tequila, so ¡Yay!

reposado

So… ¡Salud! y ¡Que viva el Niuyortáims en español!

 

Because the Colombia-Not-Columbia Blunder is so Passé…

Well, at least it doesn't say 'Columbia.'
Well, at least it doesn’t say ‘Columbia.’
Having mastered the art of writing “Colombia” when it meant to write “Columbia,” The New York Times via The Associated Press has decided to move onto yet another Latin American-themed, Spanish-language mixup.

So, as I was saying: #ItsManuelNotManual*

Just like #ItsColombiaNotColumbia

Hat tip: @tropicarlitos